Holly's OatmealHolly's Oatmeal
Holly's OatmealHolly's Oatmeal

Health Benefits

All Natural Oatmeal
What Is Whole Grains?
What Is Fiber?
Nutritional Facts
Good News for Diabetics

ALL NATURAL OATMEAL

What Are The Health Benefits Of All Natural Rolled Oats?

The benefits are countless. Oats are a healthy, benefit rich super food! Millions of Americans enjoy steaming bowls of all natural rolled oats for breakfast. What they don't realize is that in addition to being delicious, all natural healthy oats are one of the best breakfasts you can possibly eat.

One health benefit is that oats are a great source of vitamins and minerals, including magnesium, selenium, manganese and phosphorous. Oats are also a good source of vitamin B1, dietary fiber and protein, so it's the ideal food to jumpstart the day. Eating a bowl of oats in the morning helps you increase your intake of whole grains and meet the USDA Dietary Guidelines' recommendations for healthy adults of whole grains - 3 or more ounces of whole grains per day.

Benefits include:
In university studies, adults with diabetes experienced a much lower rise in blood sugar when they consumed oats, which are high in fiber. A whole grain diet that includes oats enables diabetics to cut their daily insulin intake by 38%.

Of course, whether you are diabetic or not, if you want a snack, a bowl of oatmeal might not be what comes to mind, but the truth is a bowl of oatmeal can satisfy your sweet tooth, without assaulting your blood sugar. You might crave cookies, but for the same calories, you can have a bowl full of delicious berries and grains that will satisfy your craving and your hunger!

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports that oats reduce the risk of heart disease and plaque buildup in the artery walls, which may contribute to the prevention of hardening of the arteries.

Since oats are high in dietary fiber, that is high in beta-glucan, they help reduce cholesterol. Individuals with high cholesterol levels, who consume 3 grams of soluble oat fiber per day, can lower their cholesterol level by 8-23%.

Researchers have also found that diets rich in fiber from whole grains, like oats, offer significant protection against breast cancer for pre-menopausal women -- a 52% lower risk of breast cancer than women with low fiber diets.

Another study by the Harvard School of Public Health reports that consumption of oats contributes to favorable metabolic alterations that may reduce long-term weight gain. In fact, the soluble fiber in oats fills you up by creating gels that delay stomach emptying so you feel fuller longer, which helps with weight loss.

The only thing better than enjoying a bowl of oatmeal as a sweet and creamy snack, is enjoying a bowl of Holly's oatmeal knowing that you are trimming down while you chew. Cinnamon, honey, fruits and grains all help your body to get rid of fat, lower blood sugar, and help you feel fuller, longer. Not only are you getting essential vitamins and nutrients that your body needs, but you also get that, "so good you would swear you were cheating," taste while sticking to your diet.


WHAT IS WHOLE GRAINS?

Did you know that whole grains have up to five times more antioxidant activity than do most fruits and vegetables? It's true! A whole grain is the entire edible part of any grain, including wheat, corn, barley, oats, and rice. In plants, it is considered the seed from which a new plant would grow.

The whole grain contains:

  • Bran - the outer layer of the grain and is often high in B vitamins and fiber
  • Endosperm - the inner part of the grain containing most of the protein and carbohydrates. It also contains a small amount of vitamins and minerals
  • Germ - where a new plant would come from, if it sprouts. The bulk of the edible part of the grain provides nourishment to the seed and is rich in antioxidants, vitamin E, fiber, and B vitamins

Whole grains are high in complex carbohydrates and are rich in fiber. They also contain large amounts of B vitamins and vitamin E. They are good sources of iron, zinc, selenium, and magnesium. Vitamin E and selenium are antioxidants that help protect our bodies against damage, such as cancer. A refined grain has had the husk, bran, and germ removed, leaving the endosperm. When grains are milled (processed or refined), the bran and germ portions are removed. Removing these removes much of the nutrients in the grain.

How do I know if a food contains whole grains?
Check the ingredient label. The first ingredient on the label is the ingredient found in the largest quantity in that food. Look for the key word "whole" (as in whole wheat or whole grain) in the first few ingredients.

Try something new to incorporate more whole grains, fiber, and extra nutrients into your diet. The following are whole grains:

  • Amaranth
  • Barley
  • Brown rice
  • Buckwheat
  • Bulgur
  • Corn
  • Millet
  • Oats
  • Quinoa
  • Rye
  • Spelt
  • Wheat

Different agencies have different standards for whole grains on a food label. The US Food and Drug Administration defines whole grain foods as those containing 51% or more whole-grain ingredients by weight per reference amount customarily consumed. By law, bread labeled as "whole wheat" must contain 100% whole-wheat flour. However, "wheat bread" often contains a combination of whole wheat and refined white flour.

Do not let the color of the item fool you. Caramel coloring can make refined products look brown.

The Whole Grains Council's Whole Grain Stamp defines foods as whole grain (at least 8 grams whole grain/serving) or 100% whole grain (at least 16 grams whole grain/serving). To view the stamp, go to http://wholegrainscouncil.com/find-whole-grains.


WHAT IS FIBER?

Fiber is not one thing, but a large group of widely different compounds with varied effects on the body. Fiber gives plants structure and is indigestible by humans. Because it is not digestible, it does not add calories. Fiber is found only in plant foods, but not just in whole grains. It is also in fruits, vegetables, dry beans, and nuts. Fiber is not found in animal products, such as milk, cheese, fish, poultry, or meat.

What is the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?
Fiber is classified into two broad categories - soluble and insoluble. Most plant foods contain a combination of both types of fiber in varying amounts. However, certain foods are rich in one type or the other. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and is absorbed, which has a lowering effect on blood glucose and fat levels (blood cholesterol). Insoluble fiber cannot dissolve in water and remains in the intestine, helping to prevent constipation. Soluble fiber often is used in low-fat and non-fat foods to add texture and consistency. Soluble fiber also is found in liquid foods. These fibers are called gums, mucilages, and pectin. When in the body, pectin binds fatty substances.

Soluble fiber properties can help in two ways:

  1. Controls blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. May reduce the need for insulin or medication for some individuals.
  2. Lowers blood cholesterol, especially low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Include about 25% of your daily fiber intake (5-9 grams) as soluble fiber for this potential cholesterol-lowering benefit. Use fiber to help keep cholesterol levels in check, as part of an overall healthful eating plan. Follow a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, combined with exercise, to keep cholesterol in healthful ranges

Insoluble fiber includes cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Insoluble fiber is commonly referred to as roughage. Grains are good sources of insoluble fiber (including whole grains), especially wheat, corn, rice, vegetables, and legumes. Insoluble fiber is important for avoiding constipation and hemorrhoids. When taken with adequate water/fluids, a high-fiber diet can increase stool bulk, speeds the passage of stools through the bowel, and may help to prevent bowel cancer, diverticulitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. It also is important in suppressing hunger, because with fluids, it helps us to feel full.

What are some other benefits of fiber?
Most fiber-rich foods are low in calories, take longer to chew, and make you feel full longer. As a result, they may help aid in weight loss. Foods high in fiber usually are packed with other nutrients. Whole-grain, high-fiber foods, such as whole wheat flour and brown rice, have more nutrients than their refined counterparts, white flour and white rice. While some of the nutrients are replaced or "enriched" in these refined products, not all of them are. Most experts agree that Americans need to eat more fiber. Reports indicate that we are only getting about 13 grams/day. Adults should get between 20-30 grams/day, with young adult men needing as much as 38 grams/day. More than 35 grams/day is not shown to have any more benefit and may prevent absorption of some minerals.

To ensure adequate fiber intake, eat a variety of high-fiber and whole-grain foods. If possible, get fiber from whole foods, rather than relying on fiber supplements. Eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, cereals, and legumes can help you achieve that goal. Drink plenty of liquids as you increase your fiber intake. Do not try to get all of your fiber at one meal, but instead eat some at every meal and snack. Gradually increase your fiber intake for 1 or 2 months to help prevent digestive discomfort as your body adjusts to the change.

What should I look for on labels?
Check the Nutrition Facts label to find out how much fiber is in one serving of the food. Generally, Nutrition Facts labels do not distinguish between soluble and insoluble fiber.

Some other terms found elsewhere on the food label, but not on the Nutrition Facts, include:

High fiber - the food contains 5 grams of fiber or more/serving

Good source - the food contains 2.5-4.9 grams of fiber/serving

More or added fiber - the food contains at least 2.5 grams more/serving, compared to the standard serving size


NUTRITIONAL FACTS


Cranberry Almond Oatmeal

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/2 cup (57g)
Servings Per Container 8
Amount Per Serving
 
Calories 210
Calories from Fat 5
Calories from Saturated Fat 0
 
    % Daily Value*
Total Fat .5g 1%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 0mg 0%
Total Carbohydrates 43g 14%
Dietary Fiber 8g 24%
Soluble Fiber 4g
Sugars 2g
Protein 9g
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 4% Iron 15%
* Percent Daily Values based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Goji Berry Oatmeal

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/2 cup (57g)
Servings Per Container 8
Amount Per Serving
 
Calories 210
Calories from Fat 5
Calories from Saturated Fat 0
 
    % Daily Value*
Total Fat .5g 1%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 20mg 1%
Total Carbohydrates 43g 14%
Dietary Fiber 8g 24%
Soluble Fiber 4g
Sugars 2g
Protein 9g
Vitamin A 25% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 4% Iron 15%
* Percent Daily Values based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.


Gluten Free Oatmeal

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/2 cup (57g)
Servings Per Container 8
Amount Per Serving
 
Calories 190
Calories from Fat 60
 
    % Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 11%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 15mg 1%
Total Carbohydrates 27g 9%
Dietary Fiber 5g 20%
Sugars 2g
Protein 8g
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 6% Iron 15%
* Percent Daily Values based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
 

Cranberry Gluten Free Oatmeal

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/2 cup (57g)
Servings Per Container 8
Amount Per Serving
 
Calories 190
Calories from Fat 60
 
    % Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 11%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 15mg 1%
Total Carbohydrates 27g 9%
Dietary Fiber 5g 20%
Sugars 2g
Protein 8g
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 6% Iron 15%
* Percent Daily Values based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.


Apricot Maple Nut Oatmeal

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/2 cup (57g)
Servings Per Container 8
Amount Per Serving
 
Calories 210
Calories from Fat 5
 
    % Daily Value*
Total Fat .5g 1%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 0mg 0%
Total Carbohydrates 43g 14%
Dietary Fiber 8g 24%
Soluble Fiber 4g
Sugars 2g
Protein 9g
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 4% Iron 15%
* Percent Daily Values based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
 

Wickedly Plain Oatmeal

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/2 cup (57g)
Servings Per Container 8
Amount Per Serving
 
Calories 220
Calories from Fat 30
 
    % Daily Value*
Total Fat 3.5g 5%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 0mg 0%
Total Carbohydrates 39g 13%
Dietary Fiber 8g 24%
Soluble Fiber 3g
Sugars 1g
Protein 12g
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 4% Iron 15%
* Percent Daily Values based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.


GOOD NEWS FOR DIABETICS

Ask any health expert and they will tell you oatmeal is a diabetic's best friend. The fiber and protein found in a bowl of Holly's oatmeal is just what the doctor ordered. You do remember him telling you to eat your oatmeal, right!

At Holly's, we know that just because you can't have sugar, doesn't mean you can't have a tasty, sweet snack. All of Holly's oats contain absolutely no sugar. Their sweetness is derived from the natural oat, the purest form of flavor. Plus the tasty textures of seven of the world's most nutritious grains are packed with protein and fiber. Enjoy a bowl of Triple Fruit Berrlicious oatmeal and make your doctor proud!